News

Stay connected and stay up-to-date with what is happening in the aged care industry and with Manad Plus

Published: May 29, 2019
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We have a new Aged Care Minister

Following the re-election of the Liberal Party, Prime Minister Scott Morrison has shuffled the cabinet positions around, removing Member of Parliament, Mr Ken Wyatt from his spot as Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians.

Taking over the Aged Care and Senior Australians portfolios from Mr Wyatt is Tasmanian Senator, Mr Richard Colbeck, previously the Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources.

Senator Colbeck says, “It is an important time in aged care, particularly with the Aged Care Royal Commission underway and the need to support senior Australians in their later life.

Read more:

Cabinet reshuffle results in new Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians

Published: May 27, 2019
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Updates to Guidance and Resources for Providers to support the Aged Care Quality Standards

Updated: 27 May 2019

Glossary

• Update to entry for Consumer-centred care – Care and services that are designed around an individual’s needs, preference and background. It includes partnership between consumers and providers.

Updated: 15 May 2019

New legislation:

• Aged Care Quality Act 1997 (Cth), User Rights Amendment (Charter of Aged Care Rights) Principles 2019
• Quality of Care Amendment (Minimising the Use of Restraints) Principles 2019

New content added to:

• Standard 3 – Requirement (3)(b): ““minimising restrictive practices – These interventions have high potential for harm and are practices that organisations can avoid with positive changes in how they assess, plan and deliver personal and clinical care for consumers. If an organisation uses restrictive practices such as physical or chemical restraint, these are expected to be consistent with best practice and used as a last resort, for as short a time as possible and comply with relevant legislation.”
• Standard 8 – Requirement (3)(d): “Records show how staff are trained and supported to assess or evaluate the use of restraints in order to minimise or eliminate their use.”
• Standard 8 – Requirement (3)(d): “Evidence of how the organisation monitors and reports on the use of restraints.”
• Standard 8 – Requirement (3)(e): “(ii) Minimising the use of restraint – Restraint means any practice, device or action that interferes with a consumer’s ability to make a decision or restricts a consumer’s free movement. Where restraint is clinically necessary to prevent harm, the organisation should have systems to manage how restraints are used. This is in accordance with legislation and the organisation’s policies on reporting the use of restraints.”
• Standard 8 – Requirement (3)(e): “Evidence of appropriate authorisation and consent for the use of restraints in compliance with legislation.”

Glossary – Restrictive practices: “The use of interventions and practices that have the effect of restricting the rights or freedom of movement of a person with disability. These primarily include restraint and seclusion.Chemical restraint means a restraint that is, or that involves, the use of medication or a chemical substance for the purpose of influencing a person’s behaviour, other than medication prescribed for the treatment of, or to enable treatment of, a diagnosed mental disorder, a physical illness or a physical condition. Physical restraint means any restraint other than: (a) a chemical restraint; or (b) the use of medication prescribed for the treatment of, or to enable treatment of, a diagnosed mental disorder, a physical illness or a physical condition. This guidance adopts the general principle that restrictive practices are only implemented as a last resort; are implemented for the least amount of time possible; are recorded, monitored and reviewed; have tight safeguards in place that are focused on minimising risk to consumers, staff, and others; and are undertaken with a focus on ensuring decency, humanity and respect at all stages.”

Glossary – Clinical governance: “An integrated set of leadership, behaviours, policies, procedures, responsibilities, relationships and monitoring and improvement mechanisms that are directed towards ensuring good clinical outcomes. Effective clinical governance systems ensure that everyone – from unregulated care providers, to employed or external regulated health practitioners, to managers and members of governing bodies such as boards – is accountable to consumers and the community for the delivery of clinical care that is safe, effective, integrated, high quality and continuously improving.”

Read more:

Updates to Guidance and Resources for Providers to support the Aged Care Quality Standards

Published: May 24, 2019
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Consultation on residential aged care funding reform

The department is seeking feedback on a new funding model proposed for residential aged care and other findings and recommendations of the Resource Utilisation and Classification Study (RUCS).

Submissions are currently open on the department’s Consultation Hub. Feedback on the consultation paper should be submitted to RUCS@health.gov.au and is due by 31 May 2019.

Read more:

Consultation on residential aged care funding reform

Resource Utilisation and Classification Study

Consultation Hub

Published: May 14, 2019
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Translated Charter of Aged Care Rights – template for signing

From 1 July 2019, providers must give consumers a copy of the new Charter of Aged Care Rights signed by the provider. They must also ensure that the consumer or their representative has been given a reasonable opportunity to sign a copy of the Charter.

Asking for the consumer’s signature allows them to acknowledge they have received the Charter and had assistance to understand it. Consumers are not required to sign the Charter and can commence, and/or continue to receive care and services, even if they choose not to sign the Charter.

Read more:

Translated Charter of Aged Care Rights – template for signing

Translated versions of the Charter of Aged Care Rights

Published: May 14, 2019
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Aged Care Quality Standards training for assessors now available

A training video for assessors is now available to support the introduction of the new Aged Care Quality Standards. The new Standards will apply to all Commonwealth-funded aged care services from 1 July 2019.

The training video aims to help staff in Aged Care Assessment Teams and Regional Assessment Services gain a better understanding of:

• the new Standards
• the Open Disclosure Framework
• the Clinical Governance Framework
• the single Charter of Rights

Read more:

Aged Care Quality Standards training for assessors now available

Training video

Published: May 7, 2019
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Voluntary assisted dying – considerations for Victorian aged care providers

The Voluntary Assisted Dying Act 2017 (Vic) (Act) commences in Victoria on 19 June 2019. The Act will allow Victorians at the end of life who are suffering and who meet strict eligibility criteria to request access to voluntary assisted dying (VAD).

As only medical practitioners can authorise access to VAD, aged care providers will not generally have any direct role to play in VAD. However, as many aged care recipients are at end of life, it is likely that some may seek to access VAD within the context of the aged care environment, whether in home care or residential care. Providers should be prepared to deal with requests from care recipients in relation to VAD.

Read more:

Voluntary assisted dying – considerations for Victorian aged care providers

Published: May 6, 2019
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Aged Care Quality Standards Video

A new 30-minute educational video for service providers has been produced to support compliance with new Aged Care Quality Standards. The resource is a collaboration between the Commission and online training services provider, Altura Learning.

The video is another valuable resource for aged care services as they prepare for the new aged care Quality Standards coming into effect from 1 July 2019.

Aged care services are encouraged to use the video to help educate staff about how the new Standards apply in both residential and home care settings.

What you will learn from the Aged Care Quality Standards video:

• Understand the framework that supports the Standards
• Identify the eight standards that make up the Standards
• Explain how service provider’s performance is assessed against the Standards
• Recognise the role of the organisation in meeting the Standards

📺 Watch the video here

Published: May 6, 2019
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International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative (IDDSI)

Several Clients have enquired about the new International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative (IDDSI) and if these change will be updated within the Manad Plus Assessment Templates.

The answer is yes, we will be releasing an updated Assessment Template changeset that will include the new terms and codes with our next release, version 5.7

Read more:

What is the IDDSI Framework?

IDDSI Framework + Detailed Definitions (.pdf)

Testing Methods (.pdf)

Resources

Published: May 3, 2019
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Royal Commission – Background Paper #4: Restrictive practices in residential aged care

The Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety released its forth Background Paper as part of the Royal Commission’s work.

The paper, Restrictive practices in residential aged care in Australia, notes that restrictive practices can elicit concern for a number of reasons because fundamentally, they impact on the liberty and dignity of the care recipient and without consent, their use may infringe on an elderly person’s legal rights.

“The term restrictive practices refers to activities or interventions, either physical or pharmacological that have the effect of restricting a person’s free movement or ability to make decisions. Restrictive practices are commonly referred to in the context of residential aged care as practices that control the behaviour of a resident, which may occur with the intention of reducing risks to a resident or others,” the paper notes.

“Physical and chemical restraint can have significant adverse effects on a resident, both physically and psychologically. There are also fundamental questions about their effectiveness.”

The paper also notes that there is an emerging body of evidence and guidance on strategies and non-pharmacological interventions to negate or mitigate the need for restraint by managing the underlying causes of challenging behaviour. These include measures to:

• improve the environment for residents to reduce the risk of falls or confusion
• engage familiar staff, sensory stimulation and other therapies
• individualised care routines
• increased staff interaction
• comprehensive medical examination and review of medication.

Read more:

Restrictive practices in residential aged care in Australia (.docx)

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